Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Why Kids Should Participate In Fund-Raisers

OK~ Tonight I was reminded of why my boys were the quiet, shy boys that sold their Boy Scout popcorn. I was not the Mom that plopped the order form down in the center of the table and stated, "Here you go!" I was the "other" Mom.

I was the Mom that handed my boys the form and told them to go to the door and ask the people that lived there if they would like to buy some popcorn. 9 times out of 10 my boys clammed up. They would go to the door and mumble a little something. At that point I would then explain what they were selling popcorn for and what the Pack or Troop would be doing with the money raised. I would have my boys hand them the form with a pen in hand to order what they wanted. The customer would then return the form and they would say, "Thank you."

Now there were folks through the years that knew my boys would be selling popcorn and give us their order over the phone. For those orders, my boys had to fill out the form for the customer. Yes, I was "that" Mom too. Can you say grumble?

My boys are now almost 19 and 23. The beauty of all of this is the fact that they will now talk to another person if they have too. I know that by making them sell Boy Scout popcorn they developed people skills and some salesmanship skills. After all, it's important that young adults know how to sell themselves in a job interview, so selling Boy Scout popcorn is a win-win!

I often hear, "Why should my son have to sell the popcorn when I'm the one that is going to have to pay if they don't?" My message to these parents: "Wake up! There's more to this big picture than money. Your son will be more self confident, learn people skills, and be a more well rounded person."

So, do you plop the order form down in the middle of the table at your work place or do you have your kids sell their own fundraiser items for their activities? I'm all ears on this, as maybe I've got the wrong idea. After All, It's All In a Mom's Day, Right?

7 comments:

  1. I only buy from kids and not from kids who contact me on Facebook, but kids who show up at my door.

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    1. Due to the fact that we live in the country, I will buy from someone who contacts me privately on Facebook. I did not have a Girl Scout parent or child contact me this year, so I bought them when they were in Hy-Vee. If a parent contacts me through Facebook I make arrangements for them to have their son/daughter sell to me. Great life skills are being lost in this mix of parents doing everything for their kids.

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  2. My son is always gung ho about winning the prizes for the highest sales, but when it comes down to it, he is too shy to go out and sell. I went along witb him door-to-door the first few times, but he had to do the selling himself. Now he can go it alone. I agree, important skills are to be gained through fundraising.

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    1. Yes, they learn life long skills that can never be taken away. Your son is a great example of why this matters.

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  3. Very True! I think these are great opportunities for kids to learn!

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  4. I used to hate some of the fundraisers the boys had to do. One time I objected to them selling raffle tickets because I just don't do "chances". I offered to make a donation to the soccer team instead and the coach got all nasty with me. I offered the amount of one booklet or something that was $25 which was a lot of money for us back then. I felt like I was being made to feel badly about my personal beliefs. It did not endear me to the coach, let's put it that way. I often will just make a donation if it is not something that I can use and I realize that that affects prizes but I hope that somehow the powers that be will count that as a real sale and not penalize the kids. I know I live in a fantasy world. :-)

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